U.S. EPA Recognizes Ingersoll Rand for Climate Change Leadership

03.11.2016

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) honored Ingersoll Rand in Seattle, Washington, with the Organizational Leadership Award. The award recognizes organizations that not only have their own comprehensive greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories and aggressive emissions reduction goals, but also exemplify extraordinary leadership in their internal response to climate change, and engagement of customers, peers, partners and supply chain.

Among a long list of accolades, the EPA singled Ingersoll Rand out for establishing a climate commitment that encompasses our entire product portfolio and includes refrigerant and energy efficiency initiatives.

“We are honored to be recognized for our ongoing commitment to lowering our GHG footprint across our operations and our product portfolio,” said Gary Michel, senior vice president and president, Residential HVAC and co-chair of our advisory council on sustainability. “Through our Climate Commitment, operational goals and innovative product initiatives, we are doing our part to address climate change and to lower the unsustainable demand on energy resources.”

Ingersoll Rand leads the way

This is the second Climate Leadership Award Ingersoll Rand has received. In 2012, the company was recognized by the EPA for its aggressive targets to reduce GHG emissions with the Excellence in GHG Management Goal Setting Certificate.

“I am proud to distinguish Ingersoll Rand for its outstanding actions and dedication to reduce harmful carbon pollution that leads to climate change,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “Ingersoll Rand is leading the way towards a healthy environment and demonstrates that meeting challenges of a changing climate can be done.”

To date, our Climate Commitment has supported the avoidance of approximately 2 million metric tons of CO2e globally, which is the equivalent of avoiding annual CO2 emissions from energy used in more than 270,000 homes and more than 2.1 billion pounds of coal burned. By 2030, we expect to reduce our carbon footprint by 50 million metric tons.

Scott Tew, executive director of the Center for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability (CEES), was on hand to accept the award on the company’s behalf.


 

Ingersoll Rand inverted Curve